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26 September 2018

New research to examine the local community impact of small businesses

FSB has launched a new Big Voice survey as part of a research project aiming to examine the role that small businesses and the self-employed play in the local community, alongside their economic contribution.

The project will look at how small business employers recruit, retrain and retain individuals from all backgrounds and in all circumstances, including those from the ex-Armed Forces personnel; older workers; ex-offenders; the long-term unemployed and people with a disability.

FSB says it is encouraging all its members to take part in this interesting research project by completing the short survey, which is entitled Local Community Impact.

Martin McTague, FSB’s advocacy and policy chairman, explained:

“Having a clearer picture of what small businesses and the self-employed add to our communities, in what ways, can place us in a stronger position to support the sector and influence policy changes in the best way.

“We know that SMEs contributed £1.9 trillion to the economy last year, that’s 51% of all private sector turnover in the UK. In addition to this critical economic role, small businesses play other vital roles in our communities. It’s hoped that the results of this survey will help to make this more measurable.

“It’s through having a representative sample of the voices of all of FSB’s small business and self-employed members from all sectors and industries, from all regions and nations of the UK, we can continue being the leading voice of small businesses and the self-employed and work to make the UK a better environment for them, now and into the future.

“We’re committed to representing the voices of all small businesses. This is why we urge all our members to take part in as many of our Big Voice surveys as they are able to. By taking part, they are helping us to help them.”

If you’re an FSB member who is already signed up to FSB’s Big Voice survey community, then check your emails.